Are Massachusetts State Offices Open During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Find out what is open and closed during Labor Day in Massachusetts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn about the four-phase approach to reopening the economy.

Are Massachusetts State Offices Open During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many changes in the way we live our lives, including the closure of state, county, and city offices on certain days. Federal offices only close on holidays that are recognized by the federal government. In Massachusetts, the State House is located at 24 Beacon St., and the Office of the Governor is located in Room 280 in Boston. To help you understand what is open and closed during Labor Day, here is a list of what to expect. Customers should check with their local branch for more information, according to the Massachusetts Bankers Association.

The stock exchange will be closed on Monday. In June, Massachusetts moved to Phase 2 (“Cautious”) of its four-phase approach to reopening the economy amid the pandemic. This allowed for lower-risk businesses to reopen, such as retailers, day care centers, restaurants (with outdoor table service only), hotels and other accommodations, personal services without close physical contact, youth and adult amateur sports, and driving and flight schools. The Treasury Department strives to ensure economic stability, security, and opportunity for all Massachusetts residents. Customers with post office boxes in the lobby of a retail post office should plan ahead or consult with their local manager about accessibility.

Starting May 25th, additional sectors of Phase 1 of the economy were allowed to open under a tiered approach. This included laboratory space, office space, limited personal services (including beauty salons, pet grooming, car wash), and retailers offering remote compliance and curbside pickup. The plan was developed by a 17-member Reopening Advisory Board co-chaired by Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito and Secretary of Housing and Economic Development Mike Kennealy. The board included public health experts, city leaders, and members of the business community who represented many facets of the Massachusetts economy.